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Norway - yacht charter, tourist guide, descriptions, routes, photos

Yacht charter Norway Norway is a country associated with severe fjords and waterfalls that flow down along their vertical walls, skerries, islets, virgin forests and unadulterated nature. Perfect for those who want to leave the hubbub of an everyday life behind and get back to nature. There is no better way to explore this wonderful country than by sailing.

Norway is situated on the Scandinavian Peninsula, which is surrounded by the North Sea. Apart from the western part of the peninsula, its territory comprises also Jan Mayen, the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard, and the sub-Antarctic Bouvet Island, Peter I Island, and Queen Maud Land. The west coast of the peninsula is famous for its fjords which every sailor sees as quite a challenge. Along the south coast, in turn, there goes a stretch of sandy beaches. In addition, polar days and nights also provide unforgettable experiences – in summer, the sun never sets down, while in winter the whole northern region is enveloped in total darkness.

The main tourist and sailing centres include the Oslofjorden inlet with marinas at every corner, Bergen, Tromso, and Bodo. Ports are situated closely enough to be able to easily plan a cruise from one to the other. However, a short break with the cast anchor in one of the inlets may also be an unforgettable experience. People who call in at the ports in Norway are by no means novices to sailing, and local marinas are places where good manners prevail – sailors are trusted to such a degree that they are not charged directly, but everyone has a box allotted to leave a fee inside.
 
Due to large longitudinal extent, the climate in Norway is very diverse. Its central and southern parts lie within the temperate maritime climate zone, while areas north of the Arctic circle are situated within the zone of the cold temperate maritime climate which verges on the subpolar variety on the coasts. Average annual temperature ranges from 8 °C on the west coast, to a few degrees less in the centre and in the north. There are regions where snow remains all year long, and the temperature drops to -30 °C. Seaside areas have a somewhat milder climate, and thanks to the warm air currents, the inshore waters do not get ice-bound. The inshore zone has a maritime climate, and thanks to the North Atlantic current, waters surrounding ports in the far north of the country do not ice over. However, even in summer, it is good to have a winter cap and gloves, not to mention a windproof anorak, which is an absolute must on sea. The best time for planning a cruise round Norway is between June and August, when weather conditions are most propitious for sailing.